Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Church of England Tackles Climate Change

From Charlotte Iserbyt, forwarded by Karen Bracken:

"http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/feb/12/church-climate-change-investment-great-demon-flooding?CMP=twt_gu

Don't you feel sorta sorry for "them" with all the global "deep freeze"?  Obviously, the term to be used now is "climate change". 

Thought you would like this entry from 3D which relates to the Church of England's "agenda" going way back (see bolded text):

1942
IN 1942 TIME MAGAZINE (MARCH 16, 1942) RAN AN EXTENSIVE ARTICLE IN ITS RELIGION section
dealing with a proposal by Protestant groups in the United States for a plan of action toward “a just and durable peace” for the years following the end of World War II. Excerpts from
Time’s “American Malvern” follow:
These are the high spots of organized U.S. Protestantism’s super-protestant new
program for a just and durable peace after World War II:
• Ultimately, “a world government of delegated powers.”
• Complete abandonment of U.S. isolationism.
• Strong immediate limitations on national sovereignty.
• International control of all armies and navies.
• A universal system of money... so planned as to prevent inflation and deflation.
• Worldwide freedom of immigration.
• Progressive elimination of all tariff and quota restrictions on world trade.
• “Autonomy for all subject and colonial peoples” (with much better treatment for Negroes in the U.S.).
• “No punitive reparations, no humiliating decrees of war guilt, no arbitrary dismemberment of nations.”
• A “democratically controlled” international bank “to make development capital available in all parts of the world without the predatory and imperialistic aftermath so characteristic of large-scale private and governmental loans.”
This program was adopted last week by 375 appointed representatives of 30-odd denominations called together at Ohio Wesleyan University by the Federal Council of Churches. Every local Protestant church in the country will now be urged to get behind the program. “As Christian citizens,” its sponsors affirmed, “we must seek to translate our beliefs into practical realities and to create a public opinion which will insure that
the United States shall play its full and essential part in the creation of a moral way of international living.”...
The meeting showed its temper early by passing a set of 13 “requisite principles for peace” submitted by Chairman John Foster Dulles and his inter-church Commission to Study the Basis of a Just and Durable Peace. These principles, far from putting all the onus on Germany or Japan, bade the U.S. give thought to the short-sightedness of its own policies after World War I, declared that the U.S. would have to turn over a new leaf if the world is to enjoy lasting peace....
Some of the conference’s economic opinions were almost as sensational as the extreme internationalism of its political program. It held that “a new order of economic life is both imminent and imperative”—a new order that is sure to come either “through voluntary cooperation within the framework of democracy or through explosive political revolution.” Without condemning the profit motive as such, it denounced various defects in the profit system for breeding war, demagogues and dictators, “mass unemployment, widespread dispossession from homes and farms, destitution, lack of opportunity for youth
and of security for old age.” Instead, “the church must demand economic arrangements measured by human welfare... must appeal to the Christian motive of human service as
paramount to personal gain or governmental coercion.”
“Collectivism is coming, whether we like it or not,” the delegates were told by no less a churchman than England’s Dr. William Paton, co-secretary of the World Council of Churches, but the conference did not veer as far to the left as its definitely pinko British counterpart, the now famous Malvern Conference (Time, Jan. 20, 1941). It did, however, back up Labor’s demand for an increasing share in industrial management. It echoed Labor’s
shibboleth that the denial of collective bargaining “reduces labor to a commodity.” It urged taxation designed “to the end that our wealth may be more equitably distributed.” It urged
experimentation with government and cooperative ownership....
The ultimate goal: “a duly constituted world government of delegated powers: an international legislative body, an international court with adequate jurisdiction, international
administrative bodies with necessary powers, and adequate international police forces and provision for enforcing its worldwide economic authority.” (pp. 44, 46–47)



Charlotte Thomson Iserbyt
Former Senior Policy Advisor
U.S. Department of Education
http://www.deliberatedumbingdown.com
http://www.americandeception.com
To order the updated abridged 2011 version  of "the deliberate dumbing down of america", it is available from 3D Research at Amazon.com."